My Vote is My Voice


Being an independent in-home caregiver is hard. When I was working in facilities, I thought in home care would be a cakewalk in comparison. Less physical work, a little more money and most important, plenty of one on one time…what’s the downside?
At the time I made the change, I was emotionally, physically and mentally burned out. Eight years in the same facility was enough. I had stuck it out through numerous owners, administrators and managers. For my folks, I stayed despite the abysmal wages, supply shortages and poor leadership until I realized one morning that I was sleep walking through a job that at one point I genuinely loved. It was then that I knew it was time to go. Without passion, there was little I could do to improve the situation, so when the opportunity arose, I made the leap. I didn’t consider the fact that different does not necessarily mean easier.
“This is one rabbit hole I never imagined falling through!”, I thought to myself as I pulled into work…under the confederate flag…next to a campaign sign proudly announcing support for he-who-must-not-be-named. Sigh. They know not what they do. I took a deep breath and readied myself as I unlocked the door. Nowhere in my job description does it list agreeing politically as a necessity.
Private care is a very small world. It’s just my client, her husband and I for the most part. Oh! And twelve hours of talk radio coupled with the never ending news cycle. Every hour on the hour, some group calls ranting about doomsday scenarios if a “liberal” enters the Oval Office. They are going to take down Christianity! They are helping ISIS! They are going to take your guns! Buy gold! The banks are going to crash! Blah blah blah GEORGE SOROS!…I had to google that one. The robocalls and pamphlets my folks get everyday in the mail had me half convinced he was a devil zombie monster beast. Turns out he’s a business magnate who invests and supports progressive causes. I mean, the Koch brothers do the same thing for conservatives. I never thought they were the antichrist. All of this angry and paranoid rhetoric makes me incredibly uncomfortable. The never ending phone calls and fear mongering feels very predatory. They are preying on the fear of the most vulnerable among us.
Hell, how can they NOT be uneasy? I’m a life long democrat in the prime of my life and I find myself stressed out after twelve hours of constant screaming about all the reasons we should be angry and scared. What can I expect out of my client, who is unwell and grew up with these thoughts instilled in her. I know they will be voting against their own interests out of fear, though it’s not my place to tell them so. I mainly listen to their fears, bite my tongue and try unsuccessfully to change the subject.
Still, as uncomfortable as this environment currently is for me, in many ways it’s been very beneficial. Politics aside, I love these people. They have opened up their hearts and make me feel very much a part of the family unit. They trust me and let me know in their own way that I am very valued. My client’s husband actively helps others in a variety of ways and though his occasional impatience with her disability vexes me, I have no doubt whatsoever that he loves her deeply. They have two very dedicated daughters and once a week, I cook a family dinner for everyone. The house is full of love and laughter on those days. Those are the moments that remind me that we are multi-faceted people. We needn’t define or be defined solely by our political points of view. As human beings, we are so much more dynamic than that. It’s easy to forget something so simple. It’s hard for me to see past that at times. Then I realize that I get up in arms over politics while my client handles with grace the fact that she is completely dependent on others to accomplish tasks that I take for granted every day. That puts it in perspective for me.
I will vote silently for the candidate who will do the most to protect those in my care and I will do my best to alleviate and redirect their fears. That is my role and it is so much more important than proclaiming loudly how very right I am on such issues. This election season, more than any other, compassion must trump ego. I will walk the walk and allow my vote to talk.

Small Gestures Go A Long Way

Sunflower  May

This would so much easier if there were tears, screaming or something. Hell, at this point I’d take a nightmare and violent confusion. I know how to soothe nightmares. I’m good at chasing the monsters away.
I’m not good at this.
I don’t know how to make this better, this lingering listlessness, the utter lack of energy and interest. It’s not like I’ve never seen this before: depression is wide-spread in the nursing homes. Depression is a hard thing to treat, harder still to manage in the time-crunch of Long-Term Care…the CNAs quite literally do not have the time or emotional energy to coax every one of our residents out of the deadened state of despair every time they fall into it. The sad truth is, when a resident refuses to get out of bed, that’s one less person you have to try to get back into bed later. It’s easy to let slide. It is, after all, the resident’s right to refuse. You can’t make them get up and coaxing takes time. Sometimes a lot of time. You say “I’ll get them next time,” and the next time things are so hectic that you don’t even remember your whispered promise. Eventually, you realize that you’ve let your depressed resident stay in bed for the tenth shift running…but by now it’s a habit, both for you and the resident.
I’ve seen it a hundred times, and I’ve had to turn away, had to prioritize my other residents who really wanted to get up and interact with the world over the one who continually refuses to leave their room…the one who just wants to sleep.
Not this time. I can’t make Mrs. N get up, but I can’t just leave her to wallow in her own regrets and despair.

“I’m not leaving you like this,” I say suddenly. “I’m not giving up on you, okay? I really don’t care if you appreciate it or not. I’m not giving up on you. Ok, then think, May. What helps alleviate depression?”
I rush to the window and twitch the curtains open. Light floods the room, chasing away the shadows and warming the air. A thousand dust-motes swirl in the golden beams. Well, I feel better, at least…strange how quickly the sunshine can work on human physiology. Mrs. N stirs and mutters. One eye opens, just a tiny sliver and then it’s squeezed shut with a force that only a person can only manage when they’re awake.
Well, that’s sunlight. I can’t think of anything else to do and as much as I like to shut the door and say “I’m not leaving her alone,” I can’t abandon my other residents. Also, if I push too hard, I could unravel any progress I’ve made.
I lean over her and squeeze her limp hand. “I’ll be back,” I tell her.
It’s a busy day (as per normal), so it isn’t until a couple of hours later that I’m able to slip back into Mrs. N’s room to check on her. She’s still laying motionless in her bed, but she’s oriented to the window and her eyes are open. She’s staring out at the green grass, the trees and the flowers. As I watch, a tear slips down her face.
What’s it like for her? She knows that even if she musters the energy to get up, even if she goes outside, she can’t do anything help. She can’t run across the grass, she can’t reach up and touch the trees. She can’t pick the flowers.
I rush from the room, down the hall and out the front door. Thank God for landscaping, because I don’t have to search very long to find what I was looking for.
I head back inside, back to the room that remains gloomy, in spite of the warm sunlight still pouring through the window.
“Here,” I say loudly, ignoring the way she slams her eyes closed and pretends to sleep. I set the handful of flowers I picked down on her bedside. “These are for you.”
She’s so startled that she drops the act mid-snore. I hear a call-light go off down the hall and I reluctantly turn to leave.
“Hey, little girl.”
I turn back. Mrs. N is clutching all of my flowers in her hands.
“Bring me some more tomorrow?”
“Oh, you bet,” I agree softly.

Those of us with whole bodies and sound minds, I think we often forget to appreciate the simple things. Things like opening the curtains to let in light, going outside for a walk when we feel blue. The natural world is bound up tightly in our psyche…replaced by the sterile environment of a hospital-like nursing home, is it any wonder that depression abounds in nursing homes? We can’t give our residents back everything they’ve lost: their mobility, their independence, their careers and loved ones.
By contrast, it’s a simple thing to bring a bit of nature to those who cannot go out to nature…to open a curtain, hang up pictures of landscapes, take them outside for five minutes turn on the Nature Channel, or bring a handful of flowers to a depressed resident who won’t leave her room. But simple doesn’t mean insignificant and small gestures often mean the world to someone who has learned the hard way not to take anything for granted.

There is something about nature that speaks to our primal nature, that has the ability to soothe us even after we lose our words or our will. There’s something about natural light that makes us feel at home, something about flowers that delights us. These primal instincts are a caregiver’s best friend, if you learn how to harness them.

Who’s the One with Dementia?





For those who might not have seen the ‘goddess’ of dementia care (imho) Teepa Snow in action yet:  Teepa has a wonderful skit she performs in her training programs.  At these programs the audience members are generally caregivers.  Teepa will play the role of the caregiver while an audience member takes the role of the person with dementia.  (Every caregiver becomes an expert in this role!)

Caregiver, smiling:  “OK, Jeannie, time for bed.  Let’s go to your room.”

Person with Dementia: “No.”

Caregiver: “C’mon, time for bed.”

PwD: “No.”

Caregiver, now frowning:  “Now Jeannie, it’s time for bed.  You know you’re tired.”

PwD: “No, I’m not.”

Caregiver, in a louder voice: “Jeannie, it’s time for bed.  Come with me.  You need to go to bed.”

PwD:  “No!  I’m not going.”

Caregiver, louder still:  “Yes, you are!  It’s bedtime and I have to get you ready for bed!!”

PwD, now pushing and screaming:  “There’s a stranger after me!  He wants to rip my clothes off!  Stop it!  Somebody HELP me!!  I want my Mother, where’s my Mother!!  I want to go home!!”

Caregiver, louder than ever and totally exasperated: “You come with me right this minute!  You are COMING WITH ME NOW!!

As Teepa asks at the end of her role-play: Which person seems to be the one with the cognitive problem?  The one who seems to know what she wants (not to be put to bed yet), or the one who is hell-bent on getting the dementia-impaired resident to change her mind.  The resident probably can’t change her mind at this point, especially not in response to a caregiver who repeatedly sends, in an ever louder and more frustrated voice, the same message: DESPITE YOUR WISHES, I’M GOING TO PUT YOU TO BED NOW.  If anything, the caregiver’s rising frustration triggers the resident’s fight-or-flight instincts.

For CNAs, this is the question of the hour: What do I do when a resident won’t cooperate?  Do I become more and more insistent, and in the process arouse further defiance in the resident?  Maybe I worry “I need to rush.  If I don’t get everyone ready for bed by the end of the shift, the unit manager will be furious with me.”  (PS: Remind her of that person-centered care she’s trying to sell to families—and which the brand new CMS regulations confirm.)  Do I gripe to my co-workers?  Or do I try something new.  We CNAs develop great ‘tricks of the trade.’  My secret weapon is music.  Others try chocolate.   Sometimes a short walk will help.  Or we might initiate discussion of a favorite family photo.  Trial-and-error is the name of the game.  Creative redirection.  The point, as Teepa Snow and Naomi Feil teach us, is to connect with the person.  To empathize with the underlying emotion being expressed and validate that emotion.  To engage the person in an experience they might enjoy before moving back to the ADL.

All this takes time.  But taking time to engage a resident isn’t a frill.  It’s an essential part — the best part, of being a CNA.

She Who Laughs…Lasts

“Well, this is something that I never saw coming.”, I thought to myself. I needed an immediate solution. My client’s bathroom is small, separated from the rest of her living area with a curtain to allow easy access for her wheel chair. The linen closet has one of those gold, ornate doorknobs that ends in a swirl and that swirl currently had me by my belt loop.
Think think THINK! I couldn’t reach the scissors on the sink to cut my belt loop. I couldn’t reach my client, who was standing unsteadily in front of the commode waiting to be guided down. I was stuck! Shit. I would pick today to wear these jeans.
Praying that her husband wouldn’t walk in and see through the flimsy curtain door, I did the only thing I could think to do: kicked off my converse all-stars, awkwardly climbed out of my jeans that were attached to the door and guided her down barefoot and in my undies. Let it never be said that this job does not require us to think on our feet.
The whole experience felt like it lasted an hour when in reality it was probably two minutes. After cutting my pants off of the grabby doorknob and putting them back on, I caught a glimpse of my client’s face. Utter shock. Suddenly, she was GUFFAWING! The kind of laughter that comes deep from the soul, causing her whole body to shake and tears to run down her eyes.
“You’re wearing WONDER WOMAN panties!”, she gasped, her shoulders shaking with uncontrollable laughter. That was it. I sank onto the floor as my own laughter mingled with hers. We were in hysterics. Her husband peaked in to see what was going on, saw us, rolled his eyes and left without a word. That got us started all over again.
There was a lot of laughter that shift. As the day wore on, I noticed her mobility was better, her pain level seemed more tolerable. She was engaged and curious. We went outside and sat in her garden. She gave me a recipe to try out for dinner and walked me through it, step by step. That day, she was fully present; fully in the moment.
Laughter is the best medicine, not because it physically heals but because it enriches life. It elevates the mood and in doing so has the power to alter perspective. Laughter makes the unbearable tolerable. It’s a quiet form of courage; a way of giving the finger to adversity. For me, it is an acknowledgment that joy exists in every situation, regardless of how dark it may be. Where there is humor, there is hope.
That shift was a reminder of why I love what I do…even though there are moments that I hate it. All it took was an unusual situation that required me to strip down to my skivvies and a willingness to be called Wonder Woman from now on by my client in order to renew my passion for what we do. I guess things really do happen for a reason.

The Things They Never Tell You

Sunflower  May

Here’s something that’s not quite––or not at all––a newsflash: human beings are sexual creatures.
Here’s something that’s (an often quite hilarious) newsflash: old people are still sexual creatures.
They still notice and remark on certain aspects of life that maybe we young folk would prefer they do not. Occasionally, we young folk are the ones they are noticing and remarking about.

At times this attention is sweet, like the nine marriage proposals I’ve received in the course of my career–only three of which were delivered in a location other than the shower room.
Or the time I went to wake up a resident and was subjected to a long, loud verbal tirade about how I was thoroughly unpleasant person and he was his own boss. This tirade derailed the instant he opened his eyes…prompting him to interrupt himself with “My God, you’re beautiful!” From that moment on, he treated every word out of my mouth like Gospel truth, to be obeyed immediately. I admit it: I quite enjoyed being treated like the Queen of the Universe. Being told that I was beautiful enough to derail a full-fledged, would-make-a-toddler-jealous temper tantrum didn’t hurt my confidence any either.
Then there was the time that I noticed a resident’s pant leg needed adjusting. When I bent over in front of her to fix it, I ended up getting a reminder that not everybody born before the 1960’s necessarily conforms to the Norman Rockwell image of heterosexuality. I will say that of all the passes ever made at me, hers was tasteful–far more in the nature of a compliment on my, er, physique than objectifying my body for her viewing pleasure. That woman had game.


And then, of course, there’s the far less enjoyable kind of attention. This comes in many forms, from overhearing a group of male residents ranking the female employees by sexiness, to outright asking me to climb into bed with them. You’ve got the “handsy” old men, the incessant dirty jokes, the lewd comments, the creepy stares…and the list goes on. I’m sure every aide out there has had an experience of some kind or another of this nature.
There was a time when I cleaning up an extra large BM that was, in spite of my best efforts, just getting anywhere. I became distracted from the mess when I felt the resident’s hand on my leg, slowly creeping further up. When I told him to remove his hand, he just looked at me, smiled and said: “What, don’t you like it?”
“Are you going to take your hands off me?” I asked him calmly. “Or do I have to use my hands to get yours  off me?” To illustrate my point, I held up my gloved hand…which just happened to be dripping BM. To anyone who says that there’s nothing like cold water to curb a libido, I can only guess that you’ve tried using BM. I’ve never seen anyone back off quite so fast as he did, or stay backed off for quite as long. I hardly needed to report the incident to my supervisor, whose first comment was that I “had managed the situation rather handily“.

Of course, it’s not just the residents who put on such displays of sexism and lechery. I learned very quickly to wary of certain visitors. I’ve had a visitor try to get me in trouble with my boss because I told him to keep his hands to himself. He was always trying to touch the female aides, especially trying to put his hand on a shoulder or upper arm and “steer” us around by squeezing. I objected to being touched so frequently and familiarly without my consent, especially after I politely asked him to stop. Unfortunately for me, he was one of those men who have trouble to concept of “No Means No” and began complaining to my supervisors that I was “rude”, “mean” and “hateful”.
Unfortunately for him, I’m fairly eloquent with written words and not afraid to defend myself.

Nor should you come to the conclusion that it’s only the men who make unwanted sexual advances upon staff. While I have noticed that some of the female residents do as well, they are far fewer…in no small part, I think, to the cultural conditioning that encouraged men to be aggressive and women to be passive. Also, there’s the same mentality at work that leads some of our residents to treat their caregivers as “the help”, instead of a skilled worker. When you’re perceived as standing a rung below them on the social ladder, many people feel as though they’ve been given a pass to act as they want to, without regard to your feelings.
But it exists still, with or without the spotlight. All the crap women have deal with in our still amazingly sexist culture, with a side of proximity. There is, shall we say, an intimacy of the caregiver-resident relationship that often exasperates the “normal” harassment. Personal space boundaries are in a constant state of flux in Long-Term Care. You’re often operating in what Edward T. Hall, the cultural anthropologist who pioneered the field of proxemics, called “intimate distance” (6-18 inches between you and the other person). This close proximity influences the dynamics between you and the resident, especially if that resident has dementia. They either react with hostility, “What is this stranger doing in my personal space?” or an assumption of familiarity, “She’s right next to me, so we must be close.” Or “She’s leaning over me, so she must be open to my attentions”. Inhibitions are lowered or forgotten, causing many people with dementia to act without the social filter. Is it any wonder then, when they make a move and react with confusion when they are shut down?
Of course, empathy in this situation is a tricky thing. No matter how well you’ve managed to put yourself in the resident’s shoes, how much you understand the factors that lead them to act as they do––you cannot deny the validity of your emotions. Sexual harassment is a demeaning experience, even if the perpetrator is your resident. We can’t just shrug it off and say, “Oh, well, it’s not worth the fuss,”. If we aren’t taught–or don’t learn–how to shut down such advances with compassion and firmness, we only encourage more of the same behavior, making life harder for ourselves and all our residents.

Either way, it’s one of the things they never tell you about. It’s one of the areas that we are, for the most part, told to report to our supervisors and then left to figure out on our own. How do you deal with the handsy residents, the lewd comments and other objectifying behaviors without demeaning the resident who is exhibiting the behavior? It’s one of those ethical obstacle-courses we deal with every day.

The Wit and Wisdom of Edison Terrell





Edison Terrell

Caregiver, author, and occasional contributor to this blog, Edison Terrell offers a unique perspective on caregiving and life. He is currently working on a collection of caregiver related stories and musings titled I Take My Pills with Ice Cream. Edison is a frequent poster on CNA related social media and with his blessing we are sharing a sample of his recent offerings.


Telling people to leave work at work is stupid and futile advice in Healthcare, but it’s telling that the advice is most often given by those who have bare minimal to zero patient interaction.


I realize now that the greatest obstacle to compassion is compartmentalization. It’s snuffed out like a candle the moment a person’s humanity is boiled away to simplified descriptors. Compassion can’t survive the process of a human being turned into a list of qualities.


Some days my motto is “Finish strong!” Most days it’s just “Finish.”


I think we may have lost sight of the fact that trust and scrutiny aren’t mutually exclusive. When I put on my scrubs, I expect my quality of work to be under examination, always. I expect that my team’s work is at least up to par, and that we navigate our sometimes ethically muddy road as best we can. I have a duty to my clients, my patients, my residents. Because the nature of my job gives me power over them, and power to make decisions for some of them when needed, such as when they’re extremely aggressive or can’t do things themselves. I think that with power over people comes not just a responsibility from within to do your best, but from without to analyze your behavior–in all reasonable terms–that it’s truly satisfactory. I wouldn’t wish anyone to fully trust anyone in my position to the point they turn a blind eye to what one, a few, or many are doing to bend the rules to breaking.


Even people like me who claim to want to observe the truth as it is in all its harshness and starkness at all times, hate learning the truth and living it. It’s far easier to say “l want the truth” than it is to hear it, and most if not all people–including me–who want the truth won’t hear it the first time or even the first several times. Maybe not the first hundred times.


Sometimes my compassion overflows to the point everything drops away and it’s just me and the person in need of me… Most times I’m groggy and hate being awake before noon.


I think to myself “I’m not as nice as I think I am,” and feel good with that assessment, like I’ve gotten to the heart of it: I’ve pulled back the layers of ego and exposed the shit heel underneath. But it occurs to me that by doing just that I’m letting myself off the hook. I might even be using it unconsciously as a shield. So maybe framing my thoughts in different terms will help me. I can be nicer to people. They deserve my kindness and don’t deserve my meanness; I will be nicer to people.


On the seventh day, the LTC administrator allowed her employees a 5-minute break, realizing for one sane moment she wasn’t actually God in human form. Four minutes into the break she angrily cracked the whip with a “Get back to work, slackers!” because she remembered she was actually the devil’s.


It’s not the thought or feeling that creates the mood, but my belief and investment in it. A passing cloud is only a passing cloud, no matter how dark or fearsome.


My client got the news that he would never walk again today. First time I’ve heard those words in real life and they struck so hard I felt them, too. This is a guy who never gives up, no matter the difficulty or how much of a pain in the ass he is. The droop in his shoulders were like a wall coming down.


Who gets a cold in August? Healthcare people, that’s who.


I got a call today about a potential new client from a home care agency that found me on Care. They were desperate to get someone but couldn’t match my minimum pay requirement because they “only charge the client a few dollars more an hour.” Bullshit, they bill Medicare at least $45/hour. She said she could give me 10 an hour, so I lied and said I was making 20 at my current job. She said the most she could maybe do is eleven. I waited her out. “Twelve,” she says, clearly getting annoyed. “That’s the best I can do, I don’t pay anyone that much.” I said I’d meet her Friday

That’s how my daddy taught me. Lie like a dog, cuz nobody’s first offer is gonna be what you deserve. 12 isn’t what I deserve, but it’s closer than 10. Whether I take the job or not is no consequence, the most and truly only important thing when dealing with these types is squeezing them for as much as possible.


Every aide and PT in this place is in awe that I can work with my client almost every day. They say “How do you do it? He’s so aggravating!” And I reply “I do it so I can leave my wife something behind when he finally drives me to murder-suicide.” We both laugh at that, but I’m not sure I’m not serious.


I think if I could ask the heart the value of this kindness or that kindness, big and small, the heart would answer that they have equal value. The ego calculates the weight of goodness but the heart perceives a million dollar donation the same way it does a few pennies.


There’s a vast gulf between a simple job and an easy one.


Gotta say, for a guy who recently learned he may never walk again, my client has been killing it in the gym. Privately to himself, and occasionally out loud at the end of his sessions as he collapses in his chair sweating from exertion, he tells me in a hoarse voice “I can’t believe what she said. What a discouraging notion.” But he still puts his feet on the modified exercise bike, still glances at the bars now and then from his position on the mat, and unfailingly puts everything into the workout, no matter how banal or degrading it might make him feel. This guy pushes all my buttons every day but I can’t help grudgingly admiring the guy and raving about his determination. I hope he keeps it up to the end and I get to witness one of those miracles I only see on television.


I’m more make-believe than solid on closer inspection.


I find sad/sappy music is the best for my drive to work. I tried my workout playlist a few times to psyche myself up but it just made me more tired. Downbeat stuff, though, paradoxically lifts my spirits. Maybe misery really does love company.


I have this prank I do at work where I sign up for tons of doubles and extra days and shit and this one part of my brain is like “Dude, what are you doing we’re gonna have no time off!” and I’m like “Lol don’t worry about it, bro, I’m pulling a prank. I’m not actually gonna do any of these shifts.” But then the day of the shift rolls around and I realize I’m broke and need my job more than I need to sleep and I go in anyway and it turns out I was pranking myself the whole time.


Changes that threaten me, when looked at a little more deeply, don’t actually affect me at all. Just the ideas that I hold to be me. What I want. Everything that bothers me only does so because it conflicts with an idea of the way things ought to be. But me, the closer and harder I look for me, the less I seem to exist as I believe I am. Fear is the glue that holds this false identity together, and when that fear loses its grip, so do I, and I disappear in the best way.


Every day is another priceless lesson in patience and compassion, and I mean that sincerely.


A Personal Question

Sunflower May

One of the recurring questions I heard at the Pioneer Network Conference earlier this year concerned how CNAs and other direct care workers refer to their residents/patients/clients.
I heard a variety of opinions, ranging from “Absolutely no pet names ever, it’s undignified and disrespectful” to “What does it matter?”
I don’t remember which individual it was who finally put forth the question: “Well, what does the resident think about this? Does the resident mind aides using terms of endearment?”
When I was asked for my opinion, I just shrugged and said: “I guess it depends.”

Having worked for years in Long-Term Care, this wasn’t the first time I’ve run into this issue and I doubt it will be the last. It’s one of those loaded topic, where everyone involved has surprisingly strong opinions. I think people lay bits of themselves on the line with this question…maybe it’s one of those questions that you can’t ask without thinking: “What do I want? What are my wishes and will they be respected if I can’t enforce them?”
My answer to the question is quite often met with confusion and occasionally disdain, but the truth is, I really do think it simply depends. You can’t answer this question with an absolute…it’s not that kind of question.

Some people like being called “buddy”, or “honey”, “sugar” or some other term of endearment. Some do not. Some go off the wall if person A calls them “sweetie”, but smile happily when person B calls them the same thing. (That’s me, by the way, squarely in category 3.) Residents are much the same way…being, you know, people. Individual human beings with unique preferences.

Here’s another big shocker: CNAs are also numbered among humanity. We’re people too. We each bring a different set of life experience and habits to the job. Some aides use pet names, some don’t. In my experience, good aides fall on both sides of the line. There doesn’t seem to be a one-to-one correlation.
As for me, it just slips out. It’s slightly odd, but I slip into a more Southern accent while at work (a benefit of living in multiple places is having multiple accents to switch between). “Honey”, “buddy” and “sweetie” just slide out with the Southern twang and none of my residents seem to mind…I’ve actually had residents complain if I call them only by their given names, with no endearments to follow. In front of State, no less.

Of course, I have to tailor my habits to my residents preferences. I’ve had residents ask me not to call them “honey” or “buddy” or “sweetie”––these residents are few and far between, but I’ve had them. Some prefer terms of endearment in private, one-on-one interactions and more formal modes of address in public settings like the dining room. I do my best to accommodate their wishes and preferences.
In fact, one of the very first things I’ll do when I have a new resident is to introduce myself and ask what they want me to call them. Do they want to be Mrs. P, or Mrs. Betty or just Betty? Then I play it by ear: after the initial unease, how formal is this resident in their interactions with others, with me? Do they respond better to jokes or serious discussion? How much humor on my part is tolerated? What do they call me?

In the end, this question of terms of endearment is one that I do not believe can be answered in a blanket policy. It’s a personal question needing a personal answer…and no one can supply except the resident. Even when the resident is so out of their head with dementia that they cannot remember the year or recognize their children, still they have the right to decide for themselves what they prefer. They may not be able to answer in words, but they always answer.
You just need to train yourself to hear the unspoken words hanging in the air. Don’t assume you know what another person wants. Listen before you speak for them.

There’s Nothing Like a Good Dog





As I begin the HS care routine, my thoughts wander to home, to Jenny and the girls. I always get a little tug of homesickness around this time in the shift. The girls are picking out their bedtime stories right now, each gets to choose one book and they pick one together.  They’ll gather around the bed of our youngest – along with our little Australian Shepard, Kip – and Jenny will read to them. Then, she’ll tuck them in, kiss them good night, and they’ll drift away with Wynken, Blynken and Nod. Not being there is the hardest part of being here.

Tonight, it’s worse than usual because I’ve been pulled to a unit that I’m not familiar with and I’m the outsider. I don’t know the staff well and I know nothing about the residents in my group, save for the information on my “cheat sheet” and what the other caregivers have time to tell me. For the rest I have to depend on what I can glean from the residents themselves.

Ziggy can’t help me much in that regard. He has a pleasant demeanor and he follows simple cues, but he doesn’t respond to all of my questions and when he does respond it’s with a nod or one word answer.  And he seems reluctant to maintain eye contact.

In the dietary column, the cheat sheet states that Ziggy is a “feeder,” an uncomfortably crude way of saying that he can’t eat without total assistance. But the information is accurate, as I discovered at supper time. He loves to eat – that isn’t on the cheat sheet – I couldn’t get his dinner on the spoon fast enough for him. He polished off his tray in ten minutes and accepted a second dessert when one of the regular caregivers offered. For caregivers, there is something satisfying about a resident who likes to eat. And I could tell from the regular caregivers’ interaction with him that he is just about everybody’s favorite. That isn’t on the cheat sheet either.

There is a lot about Ziggy that isn’t on the cheat sheet. You can’t tell a story in box.

He nods as I explain that I’m going to help him on to his bed, but he says nothing. Under the “transfer” column of the cheat sheet, he is listed as 1HH, meaning one human help. He is as tall as I am and not thin, but if the sheet is up to date, he should be able to bear weight and I should be able to get him into his bed without having to ask the other caregivers for help.

I position his Geri chair parallel to his bed, about midway between the head and foot. This leaves room for me to help him stand and pivot 90 degrees, then ease him into a sitting position on the edge of the bed. The next step is to use the edge of the bed as a fulcrum and help him swing his legs into the bed, effectively creating another 90 degree pivot. If all goes to plan, his head will end up straight on the pillow.

I pause after getting him on the bed. I always like to take a moment when a resident is sitting on the edge of bed, whether it’s in the process of getting out or going in.  Just to let him get his bearings after the change of position. Sometimes I’ll sit on the bed with him – for just a moment or two – steadying him if necessary.  

As I’m sitting next to Ziggy, my attention is drawn to two photos tacked to his personal poster board hanging on the wall over his night stand. Other than the Activity Department’s weekly newsletter, the photos are the only items on the board.  In most of the residents’ rooms these poster boards are covered with various personal items such as photos, greeting cards, notes, and assorted decorations. For our residents, these items sometimes serve as tangible, but slender connections to the lives they had before they came here. For us, they provide tiny shreds of evidence of who they are as people.

One of the pictures is an 8×10 of a gorgeous pure bred German Shepard standing in someone’s front yard. A smaller photo shows a much younger Ziggy kneeling next to the Shepard with his him arm draped across the dog’s back. Both photos are faded, dog-eared, and peppered with a dozen thumb-tack holes along the top edges.

From my spot on the bed, the larger photo is within arm’s reach. I lean over, remove it from the board, and hold it up in front of Ziggy.

“He’s beautiful, Ziggy.”

Ziggy reaches for the photo and I hand it to him. He studies it and nods. “Chummy is a good dog.”

Okay, present tense then. I’ll follow his lead and we’ll stay there. “Yes, he looks like a great dog.”

He nods again. “Chummy is a good, good dog.”

“Are you best buddies?”

“Yeah. He’s my dog.”

He still hasn’t taken his eyes off the photo.

 “Do you play with him?”

“Yes… he plays.”

 “There’s nothing like a good dog. I have one too.”

He looks at me, eyebrows slightly raised.

“Here, I’ll show you a picture of her.” I lean back and retrieve my wallet from my front pants pocket. I slip a small photo of Kip from its protective plastic sleeve. The picture shows Kip with all four legs off the ground, snatching a tennis ball in mid-air.

Ziggy is impressed. “He’s a good dog!”

“Yes, she is,” I agree, but I stand firm on the gender. “She loves to play fetch. We play until I get too tired to throw the ball. I always get tired way before she does.”

Ziggy chuckles, he’s familiar with that story.  I hand the photo to Ziggy. He’s still holding the picture of Chummy in his other hand and looks from one photo to the other, apparently comparing the two dogs.

“Ziggy, do you suppose Chummy is more expensive to feed than Kip?”

He grins, “Oh yes, Chummy eats a lot.”

“Kip loves to hunt.  One time she ran away and came home with the leg of a deer. And rabbits don’t dare to come in our yard anymore. Does Chummy hunt too?”

“Oh, no, no. Chummy doesn’t hunt.” He hands me Kip’s picture and returns his gaze to his Shepard. “Chummy is a good dog.”

“Do want to hear a secret about Kip, Ziggy?”

He looks back at me. “Yes… what is it?”

“My wife let’s her sleep in our bed.”

Ziggy shakes his head. “Chummy sleeps in his own bed.”

“I know, we’re not supposed to let her on our bed. But we do anyway.” I put my hand on his shoulder and say, “At least there is one thing that we both know…”

He looks at me again, “What?”

“… There’s nothing like a good dog.”

He smiles and nods. “Yes, Chummy is a good, good dog.”

I proceed with his HS care and wonder if Ziggy will dream about Chummy tonight. I hope so.

I also wonder what other connections we could make if I had more time and knew more about who Ziggy is.

The Anniversary

It’s raining.
The water drops creep down the windows in zig-zag patterns casting shadows upon my client’s face as she stares off into the distance at whatever imagery dances within her mind. She is so very far away, though I sit beside her. The familiar, soothing scent of coffee does not comfort her today. The faint sound of political pundits yelling from her husband’s television does not irritate her today. She is here but not here.
It’s raining.
She wants to go out, but her body doesn’t cooperate. I see her determination wither away.
Her pain is worse when the skies open up, but she won’t complain. She never does. She stares through her window at the ocean churning with a longing that goes beyond words and a hurt that is beyond my power to heal. She bites back the tears that have the audacity to reach her eyes and almost manages to hide her sad sigh. She’s a tough cookie, this friend within my care. My heart breaks for her because though I’m here, she is in her memories and I can’t be there.
It’s raining.
She wryly calls it her anniversary. Sixteen years ago, on this day, life as she knew it changed in an instant. In a flash, everything she thought she knew about her future was gone…just gone. I can’t wrap my mind around the pain and fear she must have felt; the grief of losing all she thought she knew. Still, she never for one second gave up. She fought. She fights still. This year, the battles have gotten harder. Her tough days have gotten tougher, but onward she pushes, one foot in front of the other.
It’s raining.
Today, she allows herself to think about what might have been. She allows herself to feel sad and angry at the hand life dealt her during the prime of her life, when she should have been enjoying the fruits of her life’s work. For just a few moments, she gives herself permission to ask “why me”.
It’s raining.
I hear the front door open and the tiny footsteps of her three year old granddaughter run through the house. It was a surprise to have a visit so early in the day. I see my client’s eyes snap back to the present in that instant. She squeezes my hand and ruefully shrugs her shoulders as if to shake off the cobwebs of yesterday…I look out the window. It’s still raining, but there are sharp rays of sunshine breaking through the angry clouds and the ocean is no longer churning.

Enabling Exploitation

Sunflower May

Times like this, I can really see the connection between nursing homes and haunted houses. Both have claims of being the abode of ghosts and, more relevantly, both seem to have innumerable nooks for people to hide in. Well, maybe not hide in, but it does seem like every time I need help, there’s no one there to help me.
I peak around another door, finally finding the person I’ve been looking for.
“Hey, do you have a second?” I say, panting just a bit. It’s been nonstop all day and I’m exhausted. Perhaps if I was only working one shift today, it wouldn’t be so bad, but it’s another double I’m working today. I swear, even my bones ache tonight.
My hall partner looks up from bagging up a brief. “What do you want now?” she grumbles. She’s been a bit…less than friendly with me and looks like she’s running out of patience.
“I need your help to get Mrs. H to bed,” I tell her, glancing at the clock hanging on the wall and immediately wishing I hadn’t. It’s much later than I thought and we still haven’t started our lunches. At this rate, I’ll be clocking back in from lunch just in time to clock out for the shift.
“Mrs. H is a tiny woman,” she says crossly.
“Yeah, but she’s not standing right now. I’m going to have to use the lift to get her in bed and I need a spotter.” Seeing the hesitation on her face, I hasten to add: “I just need help putting her to bed, I can handle the rest from there.”
My partner does not look happy, but she agrees to come help me…although she takes me at my literal word, standing in the doorway while I hook up Mrs. H to the standing lift and maneuver her into the bed. Before I even have the chance to unhook Mrs. H, my partner turns to leave.
“Go to lunch when you’re done,” she calls over her shoulder.
It takes me a few minutes, but I get Mrs. H finished up and head off to the break room. I haven’t had a chance to sit down since my first shift lunch break…many, many hours ago.

Oh, but sweet mercy, it feels good to sit down! I’m too tired to eat, so I just sit back and attempt to become one with the chair. I feel like all my bones have turned to jelly; like I’m going to have to be poured out of this beautiful, gorgeous, wonderful seat.
It’s entirely possible that my brain has checked out for the night, long before my body can. I fish my phone out of my pocket and open Facebook. Even if I can’t eat, I need to do something or I’m going to fall asleep.
It’s sitting there at the top of my newsfeed, only twelve minutes old.
Worst night ever. Partner is so damn by-the-book and can’t do anything by herself. Seriously, if you’re so lazy or weak, you’re not cut out for this job.”

Twelve minutes old. She must have posted this right after she left Mrs. H’s room. It isn’t until the phone starts to jump in my hand that I realize I’m shaking with anger. What the…I mean, come on! Facebook! By-the-book? Not cut out for this job? Weak because I asked for help with a resident who, while normally one-assist, needed lifting tonight? Would she have rather I took the chance of injuring myself or Mrs. H?


CNAs have one of the highest rates of back injuries among any other profession. Why in the world would we continue to solo-lift residents who are either require two-assist transfers or a mechanical lift?
Minstrel hit the nail on the head with her latest post. There is a “Macho” culture that has sprung up among CNAs—borne, no doubt, from the chronic short-staffed circumstances. Asking for help (and waiting for help) eats up time…time we quite honestly do not have. Every aide is therefore left with a choice: lift and take a chance on hurting yourself or go get help and fall even more behind.
You can start this job with good intentions, decide you’ll never lift a two-assist. That decision wavers the first time you see another aide lift a resident and walk away—apparently unharmed. It crumbles some more when you hear other aides rank each other by their toughness: so-and-so can lift the heaviest resident on her own. Now that’s a good aide!
That decision is left by the way side when you realize that you do not have time to things the “right way” and you take a short-cut. You lift a resident who is explicitly a two-assist. You don’t raise the bed up to change someone. You change the bariatric resident by yourself.
Now you are a good aide, a tough aide. Now you’ve earned the respect of your fellow CNAs.
And when your body succumbs to the strain, when you feel something pop or pull, when you can’t straighten your back without gasping in pain…you pick yourself back up and continue on. You grumble about the conditions that led to this injury, but you are still a good aide, a tough aide and no injury is keeping you down. You don’t have time to be hurt. You’ve seen other CNAs work injured and sick and you applauded them for their toughness. Time to prove your own.

There is, shall we say, an expectation of injury and an attitude of invulnerability at play among CNAs, two ideas that should be contradictory but are held together nonetheless. There is this mentality among Long-Term Care aides, a mentality that says by allowing ourselves to be injured, we have shown ourselves to be weak. Perhaps this is not the right phrasing. Maybe a better way to say this is by allowing ourselves to be affected by our injuries, we have shown ourselves to be sub-par CNAs, weak and “not cut out for this work”.
It’s a tough job, but we’re tougher. Those CNAs who refuse to lift, or who ask for help…these CNAs are mocked and, dare I say, bullied for their caution.

Very little of this, I’m sure, is intended to be malicious. Solo-lifting, after all, ensures that our residents are toileted when they need to be and put to bed when they ask. It ensures that they do not suffer from this broken system. Refusing to solo-lift can be construed as placing your wellbeing above that of a resident…and that’s just selfish.
Isn’t it?
Whatever the reasons and justifications of any party, the fact remains: the health of CNAs is not treated as a priority…not by management, not by the policy makers and not by the CNAs themselves.
This is a problem. True: the conditions of Long-Term Care are stacked so that injuries among CNAs are high. Yes, the resident to aide ratios are so high that doing things the right way slows you down, very often to the point that you are the last of your shift to leave every single day.

I am a CNA and I do not find it acceptable that I live in expectation of injury. I do not find it acceptable that I have to make a choice between harm done to a resident and harm done to myself. Being “by the book” is my quiet protest of the over-worked conditions of Long-Term Care. If we cut corners and finish on time, but document that we did things ” the right way”, then our complaints of being overwhelmed can be shuffled to the side. “What do you mean, you can’t care for 12 residents? You do it just fine according to my spreadsheet and your charting!”
By solo-lifting two assists, we are not proving our toughness as CNAs: we are enabling the system to exploit us.
Take care of your health. No one else is going to do it for you. This system is not set up to treat the health of CNAs as a precious resource, anymore than it is set up to treat the CNA as a valuable member of the team.
I do not solo-lift and I try to cut as few corners as I can. It is not because I am lazy or weak or not cut out for this job. It is not because I like seeing my residents wait for care. It is because this gesture is one of the few resources at my disposal to show why culture change in Long-Term Care is needed. It is my defiance of a system that exploits me and will throw me away if I break beyond repair.
As an individual, I am easy to ignore and my gesture of defiance easy to overlook. Strength comes in numbers. If every aide refused to cut corners and committed themselves to being “by the book” when it comes to lifting…well, now that would be hard to overlook.
I’d go so far as to say that would be impossible to ignore.