The Value of the CNA Voice

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Yang

There is a school of thought among some professional advocates for CNAs that says caregivers will never fully appreciate the true value of their own work until they have a better understanding of how the business of long-term care works. That, until they recognize their role in the bigger picture, caregivers will never fully grasp how they influence the larger goals of the industry and are thus left to doubt the significance of their work – and their self-worth.

While I’m not prepared to dispute any of that, I will say that in terms of utilizing resources to deliver the best care possible, the converse is far more significant: the business of long-term care can never fully come to grips with its own problems until those who establish policy and enforce standards develop a deeper awareness of what we are all about.

And it’s up to us to tell them.

Before social media, the “CNA Voice” did not have an adequate platform for independent expression. With few exceptions, CNAs were heard only through the filter of the health care hierarchy. The result was a sanitized voice, good for parroting industry buzzwords and contributing to interdisciplinary window dressing, but giving only a glimpse of how we really experience our work.

With social media, direct care workers have been given the opportunity to express themselves more openly, albeit with the caveat that you never know who is watching. The majority of these forums are administrated by caregivers and they accept a far wider range of public expression than is possible within the formal work environment.

While social media gives us a better sense of the CNA Voice, all too often it presents that voice in a fractured and superficial way. That’s just the nature of social media, which promotes interaction and response. What social media doesn’t encourage is the kind of reflection necessary to properly sort out and express that complex and often contradictory blend of thoughts and emotions that make up the inner experience of the caregiver. That is the true source of our voice – and our self-worth.

We can help long-term care understand itself by offering something precious: a dose of reality. And if there is anything that this system obsessed with image needs, it’s a steady dose of reality. Yes, there is much about the “bigger picture” that most of us don’t know. But we are aware of certain truths about long-term care in a way no one else can be. Because outside of the residents themselves, no one knows better than we do how they experience their time in long-term care. In fact, we can’t talk about our experience in a meaningful way without talking about theirs. And that is the real value of our voice.