A Different Kind of Career Path

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Alice

Two glorious days off! IN A ROW! It had been over a month and a half since I’d had that luxury and I was counting down the minutes on Friday. I planned to have a creative, productive, friend filled weekend and intended to enjoy every moment of it. I gave myself a strict “no work talk” rule and actually managed to stick with it. I drew, wrote, went to a movie, rested, caught up with friends and volunteered. As much fun as I had, by Sunday night I knew I was ready to return to the hustle and bustle of the floor.

         The idea of “career people” used to conjure up images of high powered entrepreneurs, doctors, nurses or lawyers rushing to and from important meetings; people very dedicated to their careers, sometimes to their own detriment. It never occurred to me that the term could apply every bit as much to those of us scraping by on an hourly wage in broken down facilities in a broken down system and yet, here I am, just as much of a career woman as those with advanced degrees.

       Let’s look at the facts: I’m single, without children. When I’m not at work I’m writing about work, or attempting ways to improve work. I’m incredibly dedicated to my residents and have the lofty long-term goal of doing whatever I can for as long as I can to greatly improve the system in which they are forced to live from the bottom up. That is the very definition of a career woman.

         The SYSTEM may think we are disposable, our pay, bosses, and the ethic of those who have been so burned out that they can no longer care the way they should may reinforce that idea, but it isn’t true. Ask the residents who they count on, who they trust, who knows them the best, who SEES them, and their answer will be us; the caregivers. We cannot allow anything else to dictate our self-worth or the value in what we do. I wish I could burn into the heart of every caregiver the knowledge that they are uniquely gifted and desperately needed in the lives of those who have so little. Our skills are different, not less. We are not diet nurses. We are not “ass wipers”. We are the frontline.

     I will learn and forget countless bits of knowledge as I go through my life. I don’t know if I will always be a caregiver, but I do know that whatever path I may end up on in the future will be richly informed by the career that I hold right now. As I punched in early Monday morning, I was met with smiles from my residents and fellow workers on the floor. I missed them while I was gone and though I don’t know what my future may bring, in that moment I felt like I was coming home.