How the Green House Model Makes Staff Empowerment Possible

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Yang

In my last post, I began looking at the second core value of the Green House Project: empowered staff. This features an organizational structure that “flattens” the traditional hierarchy and leaves the responsibility for day to day decisions in the home to direct care staff (shahbazim). How and why the Green House model makes this organizational structure viable from a caregiver’s perspective will be the subject of my next two or three posts.

There are three tangible and interrelated ways in which the Green House model makes it possible for the Shahbazim to perform this expanded role. First, as previously noted, the shahbaz to elder ratio is 5-1. In most LTC settings that ratio is much higher, sometimes 10-1 or more on the day shift and higher on the evening and night shifts. The higher ratios guarantee that a caregiver in a traditional setting is going to be overwhelmed with basic daily care concerns and is not a position to take on the additional burden of assuming responsibility for matters not directly related to care. The 5-1 ratio allows a shahbaz the flexibility to effectively deal with these additional responsibilities.

Second, along with the CNA requirement, shahbazim receive an additional 128 hours of training specifically related to their expanded role. This includes instruction in safe food handling, culinary skills, first aid, basic home maintenance and management skills. Shahbazim also receive instruction in dementia care, critical thinking, communication, teamwork and policies and procedures. The shahbaz builds on this foundation of knowledge and develops professionally through a combination of practical experience, coaching and peer networking. There is an expectation that with proper support, caregivers can and will grow into the expanded role.

Third, Green House homes are limited to 10-12 elders. The small scale significantly changes the nature of the problems and decisions faced by the Shahbazim as opposed to what managers deal with in large institutions. For example, nutrition in a traditional institutional setting involves a whole range of problems such as large scale procurement, storage, inventory control and staff management, not to mention the difficulties involved in preparing and delivering large volumes of food. While preparing meals for a home of 10-12 people is not a small job, the problems revolve more around individual preferences and are thus more similar to what a shahbaz experiences in his or her own home.

While we can point to these more tangible factors that make staff empowerment possible, the dynamics that really make the whole thing work are a little harder to define. But I’ll give it a shot in my next post.

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