The Power of Caregivers

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Yang

In her December 2 post on CNA Edge “Quality of Life is a Precious Gift, Alice distilled the true meaning of a caregiver’s work into one fundamental principle: “Improving the quality of life for those around us.” While the idea may seem obvious, how we go about living up to it is anything but easy, given the typical long term care work environment.

We all know the list. It’s an environment where caregivers are overworked and underpaid, overwhelmed and undersupported. It’s an environment that features disconnected management and rules that make little sense at the caregiver’s level. It’s an environment where mistrust and dissension among staff is common.  It’s an environment that breeds cynicism and futility.

While we can’t ignore the negative aspects our work environment, how we respond to them is entirely up to us. Even in the worst of circumstances, we can always do something to improve how our elders experience their time with us. In fact, doing so is a kind of moral imperative – something that we know by reason is the right thing to do and a far more powerful and consistent motivator for ethical behavior than the directives and admonishments issued by those above us in the LTC hierarchy.

Alice’s “simple idea” is more than just about doing the right thing. It provides us with a standard of behavior that we can cling to amidst the chaos. Or as Alice put it:

“For me, realizing that truth has brought me great peace. It simplifies it. I don’t have to fix, save, diagnose, manipulate, or perpetuate any negativity. My job is to make life as positive as possible and to preserve the dignity as much as possible for those in my care.”

By persistently returning to that simple idea, we make a conscious choice to liberate ourselves from the drift into despair.

May makes a similar point in her post “Soap and Thought”:

“Sometimes it’s too much, being a CNA. There’s too much stress, too much everything until I think I just can’t take it anymore. Days when I want to tear out my hair; shifts when I want to leave and not come back. The problem, I’ve come to realize, is that the bad things are the big things; the skyscraper problems that draw our eyes and threaten our strength. The good things, well, they’re quiet, understated. Things like washing my hands with a resident that is special to me.”

We need these “quiet, understated” moments. And do so our residents. These moments are as significant as the bigger issues that plague us. In some sense, they are more real. 

The common thread between these two posts is that despite the difficulties, we are not powerless. For Alice, it’s a simple idea. For May, it’s a simple act. As we proceed through our daily routines, we may not be able to directly address the larger problems, but we do have the ability to alter our immediate environment. And our immediate work environment is a big part of our residents’ living environment. In that we find our true source of power.

None of this is to suggest that direct care workers will never play a major role in making fundamental change in the Long Term Care system. In fact, it really can’t be done without us. But to play that role effectively, we must never stray too far from what really gives us our strength.  I’ll explore that idea in my next post.

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