Let’s Prove Them Wrong

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Alice

    We have received some wonderful and articulate emails from a reader who posed this question:  How do we make life better NOW for those living with dementia? She went on to explain how advocacy is what drives the flow of funding and most of the funding is going towards finding a cure for Alzheimer’s disease. While vitally important, it does nothing to help those currently living with the disease in the long term care communities. Who is speaking up for them? Who us speaking up for us?

       The frustration is that here on our level, there is little meaningful conversation of such things. We are expected to show up and take what is dished out. We don’t do it for the money, they say. It’s just a “stop-gap” job. If they were smart, they would have furthered their education. Treat someone as disposable for long enough and they begin to feel disposable; begin to act disposable. Is that what we want? Disposable people caring for the most vulnerable section of our society in their hour of greatest need?

      Or maybe it’s an indication of something deeper. They treat us as disposable because on some level they feel that those within our care are disposable. They have aged out. They no longer contribute to our society. Wisdom, experience, history, dignity are not valued commodities in this fast paced world of “me first and the give me! give me! mentality. Old, sick people barely make the priority list and those of us who care for them don’t make the list at all.

      No one SAYS that of course. I have never once seen a bumper sticker that reads Old People Suck and yet the situation in which many seniors and people with disabilities are forced to live is heartbreaking. There is no other word for it. They devalue them and by doing so they devalue us. And I’ve got news for you, folks…we allow it. Hell, sometimes we encourage it by our own behavior.

      One in four seniors will suffer from elder abuse. I’m no statistician, but I would say there is a probable correlation between quality of care and treatment of the work force. One in four. The injuries caregivers suffer on the job is sky rocketing. Again, this is supposition, but I would say exhaustion due to being forced to pull double shifts or multiple jobs to barely make ends meet would contribute to this. The standards for certification is low, the wages are low, the work is difficult, and the turnover is high. Why, why, why would ANYONE choose this quagmire? Because someone has to. Because those of us in the know have a moral obligation to do everything we can to be a part of the solution. Because it’s a battle worth fighting.

         How do we make life better NOW for those living with dementia? For all of those living with a disability that requires care? I have no idea. I’m winging it. I give the best possible care to my client. I write for this blog. I notice lonely people and try to make them less lonely. That’s the only way I know to make any difference that counts. I’ll tell you this though, the most meaningful changes are going to begin with us or not at all. They think we’re disposable. Let’s prove them wrong.       

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