More on the Green House Model of Long Term Care

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Minstrel 

In a series of posts in 2015, CNA Edge offered a caregiver’s perspective of the Green House Project, an innovative alternative model for Long Term Care. In today’s post, caregiver and guest contributor Minstrel gives her take on the Green House Project after a visit to one of the homes.

Yang has written previously on the Green House Project.  Recently I also visited a Green House Project complex.  Today these embody the most promising ways of caring for those needing long-term skilled nursing care.  It’s a tremendous care model.  I do have several reservations.

First, this model depends on having a majority of residents with substantial nest eggs.  (At one home in New Jersey, I’m told this is about $350,000.)

Second, while Green House homes do pay their Shahbazim more than what they were previously earning, they are still not earning a living wage, and some work a second job to supplement income.  One of the Green House Project’s three philosophical underpinnings is staff empowerment.  Doesn’t staff empowerment need to include their economic empowerment?  I asked this question at a GHP seminar but didn’t get a satisfactory response.

Third, as aging impacts physical and mental health, some elders will develop dementia and some will need two-person assists for transfers. We may find that even a two-to ten ratio won’t sustain the quality of care as care needs increase.  The current staffing ratios, which seem ideal, may not be adequate.  Down the line there is likely to be a need for more staff at greater cost to the home; or, if staff isn’t increased to meet the greater needs, a diminution in care.

It’s hard to imagine how this model could be affordable on a large scale — and Dr. Bill’s vision is enormous — without a changed allocation of national resources.  In 2014 the US GDP was over $17 trillion. Green House nursing homes are an economic possibility, just not a political possibility yet.  Thus the current model of LTC homes seems likely to survive.  But the culture of care — for residents of LTC homes and also for their caregivers — must and can be improved radically.  This belief is at the heart of CNA Edge’s mission.