The Tale of Two Trainers

Sunflower

May

Training new aides is an important link in the chain of long term care. Unfortunately, it’s also a link that is neglected. Today’s post starts a three-part series on my experiences with training and my own experiences on either side of the problem. First up: it’s my first day and I’m as green as green can be!

There’s something daunting about a parking lot on your first day of a new job. Most people are creatures of habit: they’ll park in the same general spot every time. I’m rather convinced that I’m in someone else’s spot…and then tell myself not be stupid. This isn’t a club, this is a job and as far as I can see, there’s no assigned parking. I walk in the side door, trying not to show my nerves. It’s my first job as a CNA and I think I’m as green as green can be. I did my clinicals in an assisted living facility and I just know that this is going to bite me in the butt. The day I did my tour of this facility…my facility, I didn’t recognize any one of the mechanical lifts the DON pointed out. Or any of the other equipment she showed me. The other girl in orientation with me had known the names of the equipment and had seemed to know what to do with them. I push aside my nerves and approach the nurse’s station. There’s a nurse there, and another young woman in scrub pants and a blue tee shirt. She isn’t wearing a name badge, so I’m not quite sure who or what she is.
“Hello,” I tell the nurse on duty.
“What do you need?” she asks gruffly.
Well, I think, that’s a great start. “I’m May,” I tell her, “I’m new here; it’s my first day. Could you tell me who–” I check my paper–“A is? I think she’s my trainer.”
“That’s me,” says the young woman in the blue shirt. “Nice to meet you, May; have you been an aide before?”
I shake my head.
“Well, we’d better get started,” she says briskly. She turns and walks away; I scramble after her. She shows me where to put my stuff and we’re off. By the end of the shift, I’m quite impressed with A’s jaw muscles: she’s kept up a steady stream of talk all shift. She introduces me to the other aides and all the residents. Resident introductions are strange, I think, as she tells me not only their name but also their transfer method and other pertinent details of care. Hoyer, standing lift, two person, one assist. Contractures, she hits, this one’s not ours, very confused, steals other residents shoes. Don’t give her your hand.
That instruction comes a bit too late as I pull back my hand, trying not to gag at the sticky, shiny layer of saliva now covering it. The resident, a woman with curly white hair and an innocent expression, had nonchalantly used my hand as a hankie, bringing to her mouth and spitting in it.
My head is spinning and I feel like I’m drowning in information. How on Earth am I supposed to remember all the details I’ve been told. On the other hand, while I feel like A has practically buried me in names and details, she isn’t as thorough with the physical side of the job. I follow her from room to room, watching while she does all the work. Whenever I try to help her, she’s just too fast to keep up with. I couldn’t tell you how she did it, let alone how to do it myself. Oh, well, I tell myself. It’s only the first day and maybe I’m just meant to shadow on the first day. I’ve barely seen H, the other new girl, all day long and whenever I do, she is trailing J, her trainer. J is also keeping up a steady stream of instructions. J also doesn’t seem to like me very much, hardly speaking to me and shaking her head whenever she overhears one of my many questions. Apparently, I should already know this stuff. First day and I’m already falling behind. Darn clinicals held at assisted living instead of nursing homes! But then, that wasn’t exactly my fault.
At the end of the sift, A tells me she wouldn’t be my trainer on the next day (as it’s her day off) and says I will be with V…then she had added, her voice full of scorn, to watch out for V and not to pick up any bad habits from her. J scoffs, rather loudly, upon hearing that V has been selected as my trainer.
Well that’s not worrisome at all, I think, before gratefully climbing in my car and driving home. I’m utterly exhausted and my head is still spinning from all the information thrown at me today…unfortunately, the only resident whose name and information I can clearly remember is Mrs. R and that’s because it’s hard to forgot that sweet little lady who spit in my hand.
The next day starts the same as the one before. I get to work, park in the same spot, notice that all the other cars are more or less parked in the same spots too and go through the side door. The same gruff nurse is there, but this time she’s alone.
“Hello,” I say again.
“V is always late,” she tells me. “Just wait here for her.”
So…always late and don’t pick up any bad habits from her. If V is the kind of employee I’m getting the idea she is, why is she the one training me today? H and J arrive and get straight to work while I’m still standing at the nurse’s station, waiting for V and trying not to get testy with impatience and nerves. At last a tall blonde sweeps in through the door. The nurse jerks a thumb at me and says: “This is May. She’s with you.”
V greets me warmly. Ok, then, I think. Maybe J and A just don’t like her. Maybe she’s not actually a bad aide. This comfortable idea last until the first room we go in, whereupon V begins to change the resident without putting on gloves.
“Um,” I say, my own gloves halfway on.
“Oh, don’t worry about it,” V says airily. “If you’re a good enough aide, you won’t get anything on your hands.”
Excuse me? What? I stare at her, a sinking feeling in my stomach. Then I snap my gloves on with a bit more noise than strictly needed. V points to the other resident in the room. “Get her dressed,” she says. Ok, then, I think.
It’s the first time I’ve ever gotten a resident dressed on my own and I’m not quite sure what’s the best way to go about it. V isn’t helping. She’s finished her own resident and is now just standing against the wall. She only speaks to tell me to hurry up…eventually she does unfold herself from the wall, only to push me aside and finish the resident herself.
Well, I guess that J and A have good reason to dislike V. I don’t think I’m too fond of her either.
The rest of the day is just more of the same. V sets me a task without telling me how to do it, mutters impatiently while I try to accomplish it, then pushes in to finish it herself. There’s no talk of hoyers or standing lifts or two assists–V insists that if you’re a good enough aide, everyone is a one assist. I’m always back from our breaks long before she is and so spend a good bit of the day waiting. The gruff nurse is still at the nurse’s station and she also doesn’t seem too fond of me, so I take to waiting on the bench outside the clock-in room. If I had a clue what I was doing, I’d go ahead and start working without V. But I don’t, so I just sit and wait.
J and H pass by; J slows down long enough to ask me: “How’s it going?”
People have called me timid before…and I know I’m shy, uncertain. I’m also young, in a strange new job and terribly frustrated. “V is hard to keep up with,” I say shortly. “And I thought you always wear gloves when providing care.”
“V!” snaps J and I turn around to see V glaring at me. Great. Just great. “While you are training new aides, you will wear gloves or I’ll tell the nurse. Got it?”
What? While you’re training? Shouldn’t that be something more along the lines of “while you are changing briefs you will wear gloves”? V just glares at me and ignores J. The rest of the day goes worse. V’s still upset with me, but she’s decided to talk to me now. She talks non-stop the rest of the shift, like A did the day before but I don’t even bother trying to remember anything she says. It’s just the same thing repeated over and over. “There’s the way you do things for your test and there’s the way you do things on the floor. You don’t have time to do things the right way. You’ll see.”
I’m quite glad when the shift is over. I ask the nurse, quietly, if it can be A that trains me next. She goes too fast, throws too much information at me and doesn’t show me how to do things as thoroughly as I’d like, but at least she wears gloves. At least she doesn’t disappear like V does.
The next day it’s A. I’m so happy I completely ignore V, who is still glaring at me.