Back to the Floor

May.                          Sunflower

It would appear as though my residents missed me.
To show how much they missed me (or perhaps to convince me never to go away again), they’ve apparently decided to throw a call-light party, complete with a few alarms…you know, just to complete the experience. The party entertainment seems to be in the form of the guest of honor, aka me, running around like a chicken with its head cut off. I’m running from room to room, sweat dripping off me and breathing hard; it’s been non-stop all day long–and the day is still young. This shift ain’t over yet and I already feel as though I need another vacation. No sooner do I answer one light than five more go off.
This is getting ridiculous.
I swing into the next room, turn off the call light and ask (in a slightly breathless voice): “Whatcha need? Are you ready to get up now?”
“No,” says Mrs. H. “Not ready to get up yet.”
“Okay then, ring again when you’re ready, good to see you and bye!”
“Stop!!” she shrieks. “Come back here!”
I stop as ordered, skidding forward just a bit from excessive momentum. Thankfully the door frame is there to help me redirect back into the room. “Yes?” I ask.
“Sit down,” she says, or rather, orders. “Sit down and tell me about your vacation. I haven’t seen you in a week!”
“That’s why you put on the call light?”
“Well, duh! I heard your voice out there and figured you were back. So sit down little girl and tell me all about your trip.”
I glance out in the hall. There’s only one other call light going off and I catch a glimpse of my hall partner heading towards it…so I close the door and sit down as requested/ordered. “It’ll have to be quick,” I tell Mrs. H. She nods and settles back against her pillows, eagerly awaiting my story.
I grin. Ah, yes. The best and worst of my job were waiting for me today: everything I can’t stand and everything I love both wrapped up in this one shift, my first back from vacation. Still, it’s good to be back.

If I had to pick one word to describe the Pioneer Network Conference, I would have to go with “thought-provoking”. (Then I’d have to argue that yes, that is one word thanks to the hyphen, thank you very much, Grammar hounds.)
Over the course of four days, I had so much information thrown at me, engaged in so many conversations, asked and answered so many questions…it was a lot.
I learned new things.
I received confirmation for ideas I’ve long held without any proof.
I heard things that made me change my mind on certain issues.
I listened to arguments for certain things that did not change my mind, but showed me how other people were convinced.
I walked away with a thousand ideas for change, and 30 or so blog post ideas.

It was rather odd, sitting shoulder-to-shoulder with administrators, DONs, ombudsmen, policy makers, and other people whose spheres of influence are much larger than my own. It was odd, noticing that we took notes at the same time during a session. I guess I had rather expected to feel small, sitting with the movers and shakers, but I didn’t. Different, maybe, but not smaller. Perhaps that was the best part of the conference: hearing other people’s perspectives and actually listening. Having other people listen to my perspective.
My sphere of influence might be comparatively small, but it does have the advantage of being personal. I can’t change whole long term care facilities, or alter policies or build new facilities based on new models of care…but I can adjust my own personal style of caregiving to better suit the needs of my folks. I can take the big picture things I’ve learned and use them to make the day-to-day lives of my residents better. I can use what I’ve learned to stretch my own assumptions and perspective, use them to formulate and articulate new blog posts.
It might only make a difference to a few people, but it will make a world of difference to those few…and that’s totally worth it for me.

In the end, it’s the people who are important. The system should serve the people, not steam-roll them into molds with labels slapped on top. For me, the system will only be fixed when it empowers people to do and be their best whatever their role, whether it be resident, CNA, DON, RN, administrator or policy makers. For me, the best system is the one that encourages connections between people, no matter their social status or job title.
Systems break down, technology becomes outdated, but those personal connections?
That’s always been the thing at the heart of caregiving. It’s certainly why I do what I do.

6 thoughts on “Back to the Floor

  1. Imelda L Maurer

    An excellent reflection and analysis. I was reminded of the co-founder of the Pioneer Network, Carter Catlett Williams. There is a Youtube clip (4 min.) of an interview with Carter. How Carter talks, with poetic eloquence, of life and relationships will also affirm your understanding of the value of relationships at all stages of life. Here’s the link:

  2. donna

    “Systems break down, technology becomes outdated, but those personal connections?
    That’s always been the thing at the heart of caregiving. It’s certainly why I do what I do.”

    Bingo! and Amen, May. It’s the personal connections, the life-giving relationships. We can survive the breakdowns in the other areas, but not in the interpersonal one. And PS, May, your sphere of influence is beyond measure.

Comments are closed.