Among Kindred Spirits

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Yang

In today’s post, I would like to share my thoughts regarding our participation in the 2016 Pioneer Network Conference.

To begin with, this was the first opportunity that Alice, May, and I got to meet each other in person. What a pleasure. After working with my co-contributors via the Internet for over two years, I knew that they were both talented and creative writers who shared my core values as a caregiver. But in getting to know them in person, I discovered two witty, well-read, and sincere individuals who were just fun to be around. It was easy see how their passion and dedication for their creative work as writers blends so well with the compassion and dedication they have toward their elders. This was evident in our conversations and in our presentation at the conference.

As special treat, we got to meet our sometime contributor and much appreciated supporter, Minstrel. This was a huge surprise, because we had no inkling that she was going to attend the conference. It was great “talking shop” with her and getting to know her a little better. Meeting her was definitely one of the highlights of the conference for us.

The conference was a surreal and wonderful experience for us. We were very well treated, not only in regard to the accommodations, which were first rate, but in the support and encouragement we received from the Pioneer Network Conference staff. Public speaking is not exactly our forte, but we felt like we were in the hands of pros, and their guidance and preparation made us feel as comfortable and confident as possible.

Alice, May, and I were given the honor of speaking to the opening plenary session of the 2016 Pioneer Network Conference. CNA’s have presented in previous conferences, but this was the first time direct care workers have addressed a plenary session. While we were thrilled with the opportunity to share our work and were very well received, it became clear after spending a few days at the conference that our invitation to appear said a lot more about the Network and the direction it is heading than it did about us.

The Pioneer Network is at the center of a culture change movement that recognizes the significance and power of the caregiver-resident relationship. While the movement has always placed this relationship at the heart of culture change, there is a growing sense that caregivers must become more active within the movement itself. Last year, only five percent of the attendees at the conference were CNAs. I’m not sure how many caregivers were there this year, but I expect it’s up from previous years. And I think it’s only the beginning.  

In coming years, I would not be surprised to see increased efforts by conference planners to reach out not only to caregivers, but to any class of workers within Long Term Care who have daily direct contact with residents. Moving away from medical and institutional models, and toward person centered models means that how elders perceive their experience in Long Term Care is paramount.  Central to that experience are the bonds they form not only with caregivers, but with housekeepers, maintenance workers, food service personnel, physical therapy aides, activity therapists – anyone, in fact, in the “neighborhood” who has daily personal direct contact with our elders.

There were times before, after, and even during our presentation that I had a sense of preaching to the converted. Obviously, this was friendly territory for caregivers who share the vision and values of the Network. At the same time, the genius of this movement lies in its acute self-awareness. Those at the center of it understand that the movement must perpetually remake itself based on the actual experience of elders and those closest to them. The movement wants and needs to be challenged, lest it become irrelevant to the people it purports to serve. If culture change means a shift in attitudes and behavior of caregivers toward those for whom they care, it also means the development of a deeper awareness on the part of policy makers – and on the part of advocates for change – of how caregivers actually experience the work. I hope that our effort to enhance such awareness did indeed serve as a challenge to the movement.

Of course, through the sessions and just talking to people, we learned a great deal at the conference ourselves. We hope that at least some of this will be evident in our future blog posts. As this movement evolves, we as individuals will have to grow with it.  New ideas emanating from practitioners at every level ensure a steady supply of new and creative approaches to old problems. Personally, I was humbled by how much I still need to learn.

Perhaps what struck me the most was how quickly we felt at home at the conference. While it was a surreal and wonderful experience, there was also something very familiar about the people there. These were kindred spirits who believe in the same thing we do. It was an honor and a pleasure to be among them.

4 thoughts on “Among Kindred Spirits

  1. ilmcdp

    I hope you grow your organization to embrace more and more CNAs who love their work and who need the impetus your own passion inspires.

    1. Yang Post author

      Thank you Imelda! I know one thing for sure: there are a lot of CNAs out there right now ready and willing to be embraced.

  2. donna

    Yang is definitely onto something when he says that if Pioneer Network leaders want this organization to remain cutting-edge, they need to take things to the next level. That means arousing as much awareness about the needs of those of us who care for elders as they have so successfully raised awareness about the kind of care that elders need if they are to thrive. There simply can’t be progress in caring for elders, if there isn’t progress in how the long-term care industry treats those who care for them. While Yang, May, and Alice became the heartbeat of the conference, they weren’t the only ones to address CNA issues. Inadequate staffing levels that leave us exhausted, sometimes injured, and unable to give the care we want to give. Oh… and our shameful wages. As two speakers, Cean Eppelheimer and Anna Ortigara of PHI put it (google them), quality care depends on quality jobs. As Yang is predicting, the genius behind and within Pioneer Network suggests that they will embrace the kind of culture change that includes the work conditions of all direct-care workers. Thank you Yang, May, and Alice for speaking for us. Thank you Pioneer Network for letting them (us) be heard.

    1. Yang Post author

      Thank you, Donna! I didn’t get a chance to attend Cean’s and Anna’s presentation. Would love it if they had a video of it.

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