Bad Boss Part 1: “Work Harder”

Sunflower

May

Note: This, like most of my posts, does not tell the story of recent events. I try to chose stories that are a few months (or years) old, although I am usually inspired by recent events or conversations which remind me of the story in question. 

All I get is a whispered warning in the hall: “Watch out for so-and-so [a person of unspecified authority in the nursing home who shall henceforth be called VIP]. She’s on a bit of a power-trip today.”
“Great,” I sigh back. This bit of information has two possible meanings:

  1. The other aide is having a Bad Day, very possibly got talked to about some deficit of care and now thinks everyone’s out to get her or
  2. VIP is actually on a power-trip and I’m going to have to try to be invisible as in addition to being everywhere at once.

We’re already working short today, and seeing as how the next shift is also short, there’s a good possibility I’m going to either be asked or ordered to work a double shift. Again. I really don’t have the energy for any more drama, I really, really don’t.
“May!”
I swing around, startled and resist the impulse to shout: “Speak of the devil!” However applicable the phrase, I fear the wording would not go down well.
“I need to see you,” VIP says. She’s dressed to the nines today, I notice and mentally calculate the cost of her outfit and accessories to be roughly a month’s worth of my wages. With, you know, the usual amount of overtime thrown in.
“Okay,” I say, bracing myself for anything.
“May, I don’t want to hear anyone saying that we are ‘short-staffed’ today or any iteration of it,” she says. “We are not. We are still within acceptable and legal ratios.” Well, technically, in our state there’s no safe staffing requirements for direct care workers/CNAs…that might very well be legal, but it’s no help on the floor…no requirements that I can find, any way. She might as well say “It’s after breakfast” when asked for the time; it’s perfectly true and very little help in figuring out if you’ve missed your favorite show. “If I hear anyone saying ‘we are short today’, or any iteration thereof, or even a mention of how difficult it is today, I will be writing up that person. Understood?”
“What am I supposed to tell my residents when they ask why I’m taking so long to get to them?”
“You’re just going to have to do your best and not let them even notice,” she says. “We do not need to be adding to their burdens because you have a few extra people today. They shouldn’t even notice a difference, it’s only four people more per group. Understood?”
I nod. Well, I’ve only been forbidden to say a few phrases: how rough can it be?

As it turns out, the only thing worse than working short of staff is being forbidden to mention this factoid.
“May, I put on my call light half an hour ago, where have you been?”
“May, this person is soaked. Why haven’t you changed him?”
“May, why isn’t this person up for the meal? What do you mean, there’s nobody available to help you with the hoyer?”
“May, why can’t you help me right now?”
“Where the hell have you been, you lazy bitch? I’ve been waiting for my shower for an hour!”
It’s chaos. I rush through my shift, begging for understanding from my folks and unable to explain why it is taking me so long to get to them. Words have always been my best weapon and I suddenly feel shackled, having been forbidden to use my words to coax or cajole patience and empathy from my folks. And I really don’t think just coming out and saying “we’re short today” would be a great shock to the increasingly frustrated and soiled residents. They’re not stupid and (for the most part) they can still count. They can see how quickly I’m running between rooms, that I haven’t stopped for a break yet, that nobody has shown up to help me. Oh, trust me, they know and my refusal to admit the truth is making some of them angry.
They aren’t the only ones. I’ve always been emotional and today has strained my control. I’m running myself ragged, haven’t had a chance to stop and breathe and for my efforts I’ve been screamed at, insulted, cussed out all day. I can’t even blame them, sitting in soiled clothes for almost an hour while I try to take care of everyone who has put on their light first. In a rather disturbing turn of events, I’m apparently having the walking-talking kind of melt-down…perhaps because I don’t have time for the actual sit-down variety. That is to say, tears are leaking from my eyes, but I haven’t stopped working and, rather bewilderingly, I’m still speaking in a semi-normal voice. I’m rushing around, doing my work in fast-forward and all the while, my sweat and tears are mixing on my cheeks. This day can’t get much worse.
I really should know better by now.

I round the corner and VIP is waiting for me. “May,” she says without preamble, “what’s going on? Why is it such chaos today?”
“…” I stammer. What can I possibly say in explanation that won’t get me written up? “I can’t keep up when it’s just me on the hall, okay? There’s just too many of them and I can’t do everything at once. Which is when they want it.”
Her eyes flash…but I never actually used the words “We’re short-staffed today.” This feels so unfair. How can I explain myself after she tied up my words and laid threats against my job?
“May, these residents deserve to have a good day without having to deal with all of our troubles. They’ve earned your best, even under challenging circumstances, so calm down, put on your big girl boots, dig a little deeper and work harder.”
Work harder? What the freaking hell does she think I’ve been doing all this time, sitting on the bathroom floor and crying my heart out? I wish! Oh, how I wish. I’m about to say something that will get me written up for sure, when a call light goes off in the room behind me. Seizing upon this gift from the heavens, I blurt out “Excuse me,” and dart in the room before VIP can say anything else. The resident in the bed looks extremely grumpy.
“May, I asked to get up an hour ago.”
“I’m sorry,” I start to say, but she doesn’t let me finish.
“May,” she says in a very different tone, “are you okay? What’s wrong? Are there not enough of you girls to take care of us today?”
“I’m running behind, but I’ll be okay,” I reply, conscious of VIP on the other side of the door. It’d be just my luck today if she had her ear pressed against the door! My resident doesn’t look like she believes me. I can’t say I blame her: faced with the evidence in the mirror over her sink, I don’t believe myself.
“You’re not okay,” she says firmly, but kindly. “You need to take a break.”
“Don’t have time.”
“Did I ask for your opinion? Did I call for a vote? Now sit down and take a minute to pull yourself together. If anyone asks, we’ll say I had to shit really bad.” That sliver of concern, of human compassion breaks the last of my control and I start to sob in earnest, out loud and quite noisily. I sink down to the floor, half-hidden by her bed, bury my face in my arms and proceed to rage and storm at the injustice of it all.
Who the hell does she think…no, that’s not it. VIP isn’t wrong in what she said. She’s actually got a good point about what my folks deserve…but under these “challenging circumstances” I don’t know how to give them what they deserve. Does she think I want my folks to soil themselves? Does she think I like having my residents sit in their own urine for hours? Does she think I’m not trying my damnedest to push through these challenging circumstances?
She isn’t wrong. She’s got a good point…and yet, it’s hard to hear the words “Work harder” from someone who is calm and collected while I’m weeping silently and uncontrollably. It’s hard to accept criticism from someone who is wearing roughly a month’s worth of my wages on her person, when I’m decidedly not looking my best. I looked at her, then I looked at myself and all I saw were the differences that divided. And I hate that. I hate thinking in binary terms, us and them, the powerful and the powerless. I hate looking at her and seeing only the wealth she’s wearing, the power she holds over me. It shouldn’t be like this. We’re both persons. Everything I believe in says we are equals…but I’m so stressed I can’t even hear my own beliefs in my own head. I hate that the only words reverberating in my mind are those that scream: “She’s on a power-trip and I’m the pavement she’s pounding.” It comes down to trust and right now, I don’t trust VIP to have my back.
Okay, calm down. Breathe in, breathe out. I’m not thinking straight and it’s likely I’m misconstruing her motives or projecting my turmoil onto her. I can’t do that. She’s got a good point, the residents shouldn’t have to bear our burdens…it’s just her approach to the problem was a bit half-baked and she didn’t consider how an overwrought CNA might take her words or choice of expensive accessories.
Calm down. Pull yourself together, if not for her than for your residents.
Because if there’s one thing in this whole mess that I have reason to be upset over, it’s that between a staff member with [unspecified] authority and a resident, it shouldn’t have been the resident who made the sacrifice to give me the time I needed to pull myself together.
When my ten minutes of rage and tears are over, I rise and splash cold water on my face. My resident still looks concerned, but she allows me to get her up and together we leave the room. Back into the chaos, but this time, I am master of myself.

<oOo>

I have been blessed: while I have had experiences with bad bosses (as detailed above), I’ve also had good bosses and, more frequently, decent bosses who were neither great nor terrible. It’s not all horror stories. It’s even mostly horror stories.

But what makes a bad boss? What combination of stresses and personal flaws combine to make a nightmare experience for those who work under these people? Sometimes it’s hard to remember, especially in the moment, that a bad boss is still just a person and not evil incarnate…a flawed human being, same as yourself. It just so happens that their flaws have the power to make your life a living hell while you labor under their authority.

11 thoughts on “Bad Boss Part 1: “Work Harder”

  1. donna

    May, usually I read a Comment several times before I actually reply. But this time, NO. First, I’m very sorry what you, and your residents, went through. Second, May, I’m as certain as I can be without actually seeing your state laws on SNF, that what your boss forced your residents to accept was abuse. You should phone the hotline number that the ‘home’ (has ever that word been used so loosely?) is required to post. Check your bulletin boards. This is really intolerable for your residents and for you. If that VIP were really a VIP in virtue and character, she would have rolled up her shirtsleeves and got to work to help.

    1. May Post author

      Thank you Donna for your comment. This story is actually several years old. It remains one of the worst experiences I have had with bad management. The resident to aide ratio was 13:1, which sadly is neither illegal nor uncommon.
      However, when it’s that high, I just cannot keep up. VIP’s power trip certainly didn’t help either! It’s a shame that bosses like this are tolerated, and I hope in my next post to explore why we put up with them and the typical aide response.

      1. donna

        I’m looking forward to your next post, May. (PS: Even though that ‘home’ might have been staffed in accordance with the state regs, that doesn’t mean that the conditions didn’t amount to abuse.)

      2. Misti

        Unfortunately it’s that horrible ratios all over our 2-10 shift usually ends up with only 4 aides and we have 85 or so census, at night we have 3 and while nights aren’t always busy they’re not always a breeze either there needs to be a set law ratio and better budgeting and wages for staff

        1. donna

          Misti, please keep in touch with CNA Edge and write about your own situation. Every voice that is heard will help. Use that abuse hotline number that LTC homes must post and USE IT. It is anonymous. With have 4 aides for 85 residents it just isn’t possible do anything but triage–and being toiletted or fed in time shouldn’t be a matter of triage! We aides have to do our part, starting with not putting up with intolerable conditions and staying silent. If we do we are complicit in abuse and self-abuse.

        2. May Post author

          I completely agree! Clearly common sense and compassion are not going to get those ratios fixed across the board, so I do think some kind of law is needed.
          And you’re right, 2nd and 3rd shift often get the short end of the stick when it comes to adequate staffing. (The above story actually took place during 2nd shift.)

  2. Anonymous

    You are a blessing to your residents, God is always there. This is by far is the hardest job but we love it. I know I do. Smile, be strong and never lose faith. God bless you May, you truly are an angel.

  3. Bob Goddard

    I think this post is amazing. It cuts to the heart of what direct care workers have to cope with on a routine basis. Not just the heavy work loads, but managers who love throwing slogans and platitudes around as if they were actual solutions to anything. Who use those words like a Soviet commissar, to berate those who would question that parallel reality – the facade – they’ve constructed for their own purposes. LTC has too much of this. Our residents absolutely have the right to know when we’re working short. It’s not about complaining or making excuses. It’s a hardcore reality and one that we have to deal with along with our residents. Pretending it’s not there only makes it worse. I’m glad you told us in above comment that this happened two years ago. “Only four extra people…” I was about ready to go full-on nuclear..

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