Hangman Holidays

Sunflower   May

In compliance with HIPAA, all resident names and identifying details have been altered or removed. 

Perhaps the strangest part of being a healthcare worker emerges around the holidays. A lot of my family and friends talk about how what they are going to do with their time off; I wonder if I’m going to get any time off or if I’ll have to work extra this year again. 

This is by no means exclusive to healthcare…but it often feels like it. The debate that rages around stores being open during holidays is always “Why do they need to be open? We can shop/go to the movies/eat out/do whatever another day!” You can’t really say that about healthcare. In fact, I’m pretty sure that if all nursing homes and hospitals closed on Christmas, society would come to screeching, screaming halt. No one would celebrate and many would die from lack of care. 

So, nursing homes and hospitals must stay open during holidays, which means they must be staffed. Which means CNAs (among others) must give up their holidays to show up at work and care for their residents. 

The problem is, we want time off to celebrate with our families just as much as everyone else. There’s always an increased amount of grumbling during the holiday season as we try to squeeze family dinners into our few hours off,  have to wake the kids really early in order to them open presents on Christmas morning and miss our various religious services because of our hectic work schedule. There’s a bit of resentment that creeps in even the most dedicated hearts when we’re wearing scrubs while everyone else is dressing up. 

Scheduling around the holidays is like playing Hangman on steroids. It’s trying to guess who’s going to call in because she “deserves Christmas morning off”, who’s going to be cranky all day, who’s going to trade hours with whom. Some aides always seem to be able to get off, while other aides always seem to work every holiday. The reliable/really dedicated aides get called out like vowels during a game of Hangman, which creates its own kind of resentment when you’ve worked doubles on Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year’s Eve and then you’re also asked to work New Year’s Day. 

It’s not all bad. I love being with my residents on holidays…just as long as I get a chance for me to celebrate as well. Really, it’s the usual short-staffed story, just exasperated because of all the holiday cheer and emphasis our culture puts on having time off and family get-togethers.

How do you all cope with the craziness of the holiday season at work?

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