Claire’s Chairs

 

 

Bob Goddard

One of the primary concerns in Claire’s early development is her tendency to rely on arching her back as a means of movement. Like any other infant, she has a natural impulse to move her body, but because of her ACC she is unable to easily perform more complex forms of movement that require coordinating her hips, legs, and arms, such as crawling or sitting up by herself. Her dependence on arching inhibits her gaining the strength, flexibility, and confidence required for these more refined movements. We must condition her not to pop into that backward extension.

One of the key elements in helping Claire overcome her “arch addiction” is posture training. The mantra here is 90-90-90: hips at 90 degrees, knees at 90 degrees, heels at 90 degrees. For this, we have a small arsenal of chairs at our disposal.

The most useful of the bunch is the corner chair:

Not only does the corner chair help Claire maintain the 90-90-90, it also provides support on each side. A tray fits over her lap, allowing her to manipulate and play with objects and enables us to engage with her without the necessity of us physically supporting her. The corner chair is comfortable and secure enough that she can spend up to an hour or more at time in it. Since Claire spends most of her time at home, we keep the corner chair at Hiliary’s house.

At our house we use the Lechy chair. This essentially works the same as the corner chair, but without the side supports. We have to make several modifications to make it work for Claire: we use a book to bring her small body forward in the chair so that her knees are at 90, an empty box for a platform to rest her feet, and a scarf loosely secured around her ankles to help keep her feet at or near the all-important 90. As with the corner chair, there is a tray for activities.

I also use what I simply call the “red chair.” Claire is secured in the red chair by vertical straps and a pommel. The floor serves as a platform for her feet. Unlike the corner chair and Lechy chair, I have to stay within arm’s reach of Claire while she’s in the red chair because she is quite capable of rocking it and there is a real potential for a pretty severe face plant. One advantage of the red chair is that there is zero pressure on her abdomen, so I actually prefer to use it after she eats. This is especially important given Claire’s problem with acid re-flux.

While the chairs serve a critical function, they are only a part of the program. The real strengthening comes from floor play, and from the habits and practices of her caregivers: how we carry her, hold her, and pick her up. I’ll talk about these in upcoming posts.

At some point, Claire will learn to sit up by herself and crawl and eventually walk. But the quality of these accomplishments will depend in large part on how well we can help strengthen and redirect her body now. And since it all works together, this will have a major impact on her cognitive, social and psychological development as well.

One thought on “Claire’s Chairs

  1. donna

    This continues to be an amazing account of creative, devoted caregiver, Bob. Who would know how much the choice of sitting positions and chairs depends affects development.

    Reply

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