Beneath the Roles We Play


Alice
Lucinda. To some, she is the manager at the super market on my corner. To others, she is the cashier, if they notice her at all. To me, she is a person with whom I interact with on a regular basis. She is a mother. She is a woman who worked from the bottom up and isn’t afraid or above hopping on a register when the store is short staffed. She is someone who managed to dig deep and find a genuine smile despite the fact that she had to show up to work after leaving the funeral of a loved one. I know this because I noticed the tracks of the tears that escaped her make up and I asked her about it. She knows my name and I know hers.
We interact with thousands of people in our lifetime. How often do we take a second to acknowledge their humanity outside of the limited role that they play in our lives? Do we see the person first or the service we expect them to provide for us,paid or otherwise?
My years as a caregiver have honed my ability to see a person beneath whatever descriptor they may hold. Quality of life is not improved by seeing a resident’s disorder before seeing them as a person. By knowing their individual personalities and preferences, I am able to provide better care and remind them that they are deeply valued as people. A person who feels worthwhile is less likely to be combative and angry. A person who knows you are a friend is more willing to trust, to be open about how they feel and less likely to feel alone and afraid. No one, myself included, wants to be seen solely as one thing. It is true on the job and it is true in the world.
Civility is slowly dying because our circles of empathy are shrinking. People view life through this filter of self. How do you and your actions affect me? We are all guilty of it. Just because I am aware of this doesn’t mean I don’t fall into that trap; that age old opera of ME ME ME ME ME when the reality is most of the time it’s not about me at all.
My work reminds me of that in thousands of ways, big and small. Those in my care manage to maintain their dignity through challenges that I can’t imagine facing. Even my most difficult and moody folks maintain the ability to occasionally laugh through constant pain. They help one another through the heartbreakingly tough days. Even those that don’t get along show each other support and notice when someone is missing from the hall. Somehow, through all of their troubles, most of them manage to smile at us and say thank you. It is impossible for me not to be humbled by that; to not strive to be just a little bit better every day at living well among other people.
We lost a resident this week. Sometimes it seems like I always see it coming but I never see it coming. I know the inevitable for the demographic with whom I work, but for me it’s always about their life. I never feel quite prepared for their death. This fellow left an impression that will stay with me for the rest of my life. A few weeks ago, I was working on his hall and saw his light on during my 2:00 AM hall check. Curious, I knocked on his door.
“Come in!”, he answered with more enthusiasm than I had at that hour. He was sitting in his recliner, listening to a book on tape as he carefully cut out a rectangle from the bottom of a square plastic cross stitch board. He had quite a stack of them piled on the side table beside him. This was no small feat as he was as close to legally blind as one could get. He explained to me that they could help the vision impaired to sign documents. Just line up the cut out rectangle above the space on which they need to sign and use the plastic as a guide for the pen. Voila! No more shaky, sloppy signatures. He asked me to hand them out to anyone I knew with poor eyesight. He went on to say that he was in a program that offered free audio books to anyone who no longer had the ability to read if I knew anyone who would be interested. I was thunderstruck with his courage. He didn’t even know he was brave and I knew instinctively that if I pointed it out, it would only make him feel uncomfortable. This was just who he was. To comment upon it as if it was an isolated event would cheapen it somehow. Still, I thought about it a lot for the next week. Here was a man who by all rights had every reason to feel sorry for himself. No one would blame him and yet there he was using his mind, creativity, compassion and his own personal struggles to make the lives of others better in a way that no one else could. It was nothing short of amazing and the fact that I was able to witness this empathy and gutsy perserverance in action was a gift that I will never take for granted. The very least I can do is get to know Lucinda; to do my best to see people beyond what roles they play in my life and what they do to me or for me. It is yet another reminder that the lessons are there. They are always there. I learn them when I become willing to see.

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