Long Term Care’s “Trans” Issue

 

 

Minstrel

When the issue of CNA wages is raised, the response is never “Sorry, we don’t think you deserve better wages. We’re not going to pay you enough to live on if we can get you to work for peanuts.” No: administrators will say, “Yes, we know aides are worth more and we would love to pay higher wages. We just can’t afford to. The money isn’t there.”

Are you sure about that? Show me the money. Let us see your budget. Every organization has a budget, detailing what comes in and what goes out and where it goes. Long-term-care administrators tell us they can’t find the money to increase wages or benefits of aides. Maybe so, but we aides would like to be included in the search.

This is about transparency in money matters. If you attend conferences and webinars and read articles on how to achieve quality care in long-term-care homes, you will often hear the word ‘empowerment.’ Residents need to be empowered. Persons living with dementia need to be empowered. And direct-care workers need to be empowered—that’s what the experts say. What could be more empowering than having a say in how money is spent? Including aides in a transparent discussion of resource allotment would demonstrate trust in us, respect for us, and appreciation for the creativity we might bring to problem-solving. There may not be a wealth of money being wasted or misspent. But aides are in a unique position to see opportunities for cost savings that others might overlook. As a CNA I saw the amount of food that, at the end of every meals wasn’t in the stomachs of residents but in black plastic waste bags. I saw the wastefulness in our use of disposable items like plastic cups, paper plates and napkins. Without impacting the welfare of residents, aides might find multiple ways of cutting costs so that money might be re-directed. We might bring fresh vision to decision-making about saving and spending. Give us a chance!

Perhaps administrators protect budget secrecy out of embarrassment over the wide gap between the salaries of aides and the salaries of the executive and managers. Or out of worry that this knowledge might lead to poor morale and workplace unrest. Maybe the organization worries about privacy rights; why should anyone’s salary be public knowledge? First of all, budget transparency doesn’t mean that individuals’ salaries have to be known. (However, if it did, would this be so bad? Americans are more open about their sexual practices than about their finances! We know the salaries of the President and members of Congress and of the CEO’s of publicly-traded corporations. It is a tool of accountability.) There are ways to protect information about individual salaries (as the federal government does for federal civil servants) while making information available about salary ranges, the percentage of the budget spent on various classes of jobs, etc. This privacy issue is an excuse, a ploy to halt discussion before it starts. It’s not a justification for saying no to transparency.

Aides aren’t children. We’re capable of understanding issues, of being reasonable. We can understand that some positions merit higher wages than others and that some employees will deserve to earn more than others. We can be patient about wage increases. But we shouldn’t be shunted off to the side when budgets are discussed, as if we were just another piece of mechanical equipment in the workplace. We need to breach this wall that seems to create a ‘them’ and an ‘us,’ the intelligent responsible people on one side and lower class workers on the other. We are all part of the care community; we all want to improve it. One way to do this is to make budgets more transparent. If we want to retain employees and attract new job seekers, salaries and working conditions must become more appealing. I suspect that money might be found to do this, if budgets were transparent to all stakeholders.

We hear a lot about the need for culture change in long-term care. Budget transparency is a culture change issue that we don’t hear about yet. Let’s hear a call for transparency from the leaders of the culture change movement. Let’s hear it now!

2 thoughts on “Long Term Care’s “Trans” Issue

  1. Becky Mc cue

    I wholeheartedly agree with your thoughts. As a current CNA, I clear three to four hundred dollars per week. (11.00/hr.) Six days a week including. Sundays, no benefits I received my first CNA license in 1978 from accredited class at local hospital. Worked for registry three years later. Paid 10.00/ hr. Plus health insurance. We should look at the Japanese. They really know how to run a LTC facility the Right WAY! Thank you

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