Tag Archives: advocacy

A Call to Arms

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Alice

“I have to stop. This is getting ridiculous.”, I thought. It was my day off and I accidentally-on-purpose stumbled into the world of online news articles…two hours earlier. It wasn’t the articles that I found so disturbingly riveting. If I had learned anything this election cycle, it was to find and get my information from legitimate and objective sources and to stay away from opinion pieces disguised as fact. No. It wasn’t the articles. It was the comments section. I had jumped down a rabbit hole into a world in which I had no business being.
The level of hostility driven by fear took my breath away. Comment after comment of anger and name calling; fully grown adults incapable of completing a thought without using expletives, their words screaming off of my computer screen. It did not matter what side of the pointless argument they took. This was equal opportunity rage and poor behavior and it fed off itself; a snowball effect of dark emotion fueled by the safety of anonymity. It was as if no one recognized that they were talking to other human beings and it is bleeding into the world beyond the World Wide Web.
That’s when it hit me. We caregivers have a unique opportunity in this climate. I know this sounds like a stretch, but follow me here for a minute. In my capacity as a caregiver, I have had clients and residents from just about every walk of life: Rich, poor, black, white, middle eastern, Mexican, gay, straight, super religious and die hard atheists; people living with a variety of physical and mental disorders and people from all sides of the political spectrum. None of that mattered. The very nature of our work depends on seeing people beneath their disorder and knowing who they are in order to provide the best quality of care. Personal disagreements on politics or religion in no way factored in and because of this I have learned from those with whom I wouldn’t ordinarily have had the opportunity to engage and have been blessed with many close friendships that often arise from the caregiver/ client relationship. I have never, not one single time viewed a client as simply one thing. I didn’t think of them as their disorder, race, religion, politics or whether or not they were private pay. I know them by their stories, by what they share with me and their personalities. We, as caregivers, do this naturally. It becomes second nature. We remind those in our care that they are human beings, first and foremost, and deserve to be treated with dignity. Imagine if we collectively used those lessons we learned from our work on every person we meet. Imagine if we could teach those lessons to others by our actions. Wouldn’t THAT be a movement worth starting!
As a society, we have to stop allowing the worst of our anger and fear to dictate our behavior. We can not allow ourselves to pigeonhole others to the point of only seeing our differences. We have to do better than this. I think those of us in the caregiving field have a responsibility now to apply our expertise to the world at large. We have a deeper calling. Today is Martin Luther King Jr. Day so I would like to end this plea with the man who said it so much better than I ever could and who backed his words with his actions:

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.”

“Faith is taking the first step even when you don’t see the whole staircase.”

”I look to a day when people will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”